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PCI one of many tribes to support veterans memorial

The Poarch Creek Indians is one of 85 Tribes, individuals and organizations who have supported the erecting of the National Native American Veterans Memorial, which was unveiled on Nov. 11, according to reports.

Shown is the Native American Veterans Memorial. | Submitted photo

According to a news story on Native News Online’s website, the memorial is located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. at the National Museum of the American Indian.

Due to the pandemic, the opening of the memorial was held virtually on the museum’s website.

“The National Native American Veterans Memorial will serve as a reminder to the nation and the world of the service and sacrifice of Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian veterans,” said Kevin Gover, director of the museum. “Native Americans have always answered the call to serve, and this memorial is a fitting tribute to their patriotism and deep commitment to this country.”

According to the Native News Online’s website, American Indians and Alaska Natives serve in the U.S. armed forces at a higher rate than any other demographic. Some 19 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives have served in the military compared to an average of 14 percent of other racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. since 9/11, according to the site.

The memorial, which sits on the grounds of the museum, was commissioned by Congress to give “all Americans the opportunity to learn of the proud and courageous tradition of service of Native Americans in the Armed Forces of the United States.” Native Americans have served in every major military conflict in the U.S. since the Revolutionary War. This will be the first national landmark in Washington to focus on the contributions of American Indians, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians who have served in the military.

Those who supported the veterans memorial include the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes; Chickasaw Nation; Margaret A. Cargill Philanthropies; Poarch Band of Creek Indians; San Manuel Band of Mission Indians; and Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community. The memorial has also been widely supported by tribal governments and tribal veterans organizations. More than 85 tribes, individuals, corporations and other organizations have contributed to the memorial.